Challenge Based Learning: Sustainability

We have committed to implementing Challenge Based Learning across the school. You can read more about CBL in an earlier post Towards Authentic Learning – CBL

Year 6 students explore energy.

Students apply their knowledge and understanding of energy to solve sustainability challenges in the community. Students publish their ideas via blogs – sharing with the broader community.

Our local Federal Member learns about the work students are doing to develop a sustainable community.

Year 6 Sustainability Fair – sharing ideas and artefacts regarding sustainability with the community. 

Advertisements

Towards Authentic Learning – CBL

 
Recently we have been considering various Project Based approaches to learning. One of the key drivers for us is the idea of providing authentic learning opportunities for our students. One approach which we are exploring is Challenge Based Learning (CBL). I have gathered together a few links which provide some insight about this approach. Interestingly some schools in the US dabbled with CBL participating in the study conducted by NMC, but I have found little evidence of continued involvement. There is a forum, but nothing much new. I wonder whether the focus on standardised, national testing has undermined the CBL initiative there.

The main activity I found seemed focussed in Australia and most specifically in Victoria. Here I must comment that Victoria demonstrates a consistency around innovation. We have found that many of the trends that have interested our own reinvention are ideas which Victoria has embraced or explored before us. 

What is Challenge Based Learning?

“Challenge Based Learning – an engaging, multidisciplinary approach to learning that encourages students to leverage the technology they use in their daily lives to solve real-world problems.”

Benefits of Challenge Based Learning

A flexible framework for learning with multiple entry points

A scalable model with no proprietary systems or subscriptions

Places students in charge of their learning

Focuses on global challenges with local solutions

Promotes the authentic use of technology

Develops 21st century skills

Encourages deep reflection on teaching and learning
Case for:  http://www.nmc.org/pdf/Challenge-Based-Learning.pdf. New Media Consortium (Horizon Report)

Toolkit: https://www.challengebasedlearning.org/public/toolkit_resource/cf/0a/0ac5_8c6c.pdf?c=137d
CBL Website: https://challengebasedlearning.org/pages/welcome
iTunesU library – search for “Challenge Based Learning”.

  • Kalinda Primary School

ACARA – illustration Kalinda revising their approach to Curriculum and leveraging CBL to improve student learning. http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Illustrations/Metadata/IPCM00014?group=SchoolLocation

School website: http://www.kalinda.vic.edu.au/page/78/Challenge-Based-Learning

  • Mont Albert Primary School

Victorian Government – seeking a solution beyond an “Inquiry Based” approach and using CBL to meet student needs.

https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/pages/View.aspx?pin=7YWDQY

School website: http://www.maps.vic.edu.au/page/70%20

  • Ringwood North Primary School

Victorian Government: https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/pages/View.aspx?pin=RYJ7RS

School website: http://www.ringwoodnorthps.vic.edu.au

  • Wonga Park Primary School

School webpage: http://www.wongapark.vic.edu.au/Pages/challenge-based-learning.aspx

About CBL: http://www.wongapark.vic.edu.au/Pages/Programs.aspx

School Website: http://www.wongapark.vic.edu.au

A Little Inspiration Along The Way

Last week I attended a short session with Dr Ruben Puentedura and Dr Damian Bebell. Apologies, my notes here are brief (I was feeling unwell). They certainly provided a little food for thought and inspiration.

Dr Puentedura looked at examples coupling the SAMR Model with Blooms Taxonomy and with Challenge Based Learning. It was easy to see how the SAMR Model fitted well with both. The basic premise is that some aspects of Blooms or CBL fit well with different levels of the SAMR Model – see below. 
Redefinition – Evaluating, Creating

Modification – Applying, Analysing, Evaluating

Augmentation – Understanding, Applying

Substitution – Remembering

(Note: Kathy Schrock also refers to this coupling of SAMR and Blooms ref: http://www.schrockguide.net/samr.html

I will explore the coupling of SAMR with Challenge Based Learning Model further. Dr Puentedura showed examples which explained how this would fit well with SAMR. (Ref re Challenge Based Learning – https://www.apple.com/au/education/docs/CBL_Classroom_Guide_Jan_2011.pdf

Dr Damian Bebell spoke extensively about the disconnect of traditional assessments and options around other forms of assessment. This is certainly something which educators need to consider as our classrooms and our teaching/learning models are changing. http://edtechteacher.org/using-research-data-to-define-measure-success-live-blog-of-dr-damian-bebell-at-lfl15/

Discussion: 

What is success?

How do you know if what you are doing is working?

He discussed that there are valid assessment tools which can measure creativity. 

In discussion we considered the importance of engagement, formative feedback, peer assessment.

One particularly useful assessment tool that Dr Bebell referenced was the use of drawings. I liked this idea it is relatively non invasive, and as he pointed out, can provide valid data and poignant feedback. He showed a range of examples e.g. Draw yourself learning in the classroom, draw yourself writing. In these examples we were able to quickly see what learning models might be occurring in a particular learning environment. In some research that Dr Bebell had conducted, using this method, it was interesting to note that in 1:1 device environments about 92% of students referenced using their device for writing while in a shared device environment over 70% referenced using pen and paper.

In our own circumstance we are encouraging teachers to seek feedback from students about their learning experience. Using pictures to provide feedback might be a way to help do this. 

Certainly exploring Dr Bebell’s work further may help to inform our own teaching/learning models.