Revelling in STEM – a week of activity to immerse teachers and students



In our experience real tangible opportunities for teachers and students to be immersed in technology is key to enabling integration.

We have raised money to support a STEM initiative which involved a range of new gear. We used a some external providers to help enable a week of immersion. Here are a few snapshots from a week of activity. 

A Visit From Northern New South Wales

   
We recently hosted the visit of a leadership team from a school in Coffs Harbour. The visitors had travelled to Sydney to learn specifically about technology integration occurring at a couple of schools in Sydney.

The visitors were treated to a smorgasbord of technology integration. They enjoyed opportunities to interact with the children and they were provided with opportunities to connect with teachers. 
As I journeyed around the school, facilitating the visit, I was privileged to witness  some great learning in action. This is possibly the best part of my job – seeing the engagement of our students and the innovative ways in which technology has permeated our learning programs. We are happy to open our doors and to share what has worked for us and make valuable connections with other educators too. 

Below is the plan for the visit which provides a snapshot of the experience.

Visit Plan:

1:00pm – Principal, ICT Coordinator  – Meet / Greet – looking at the Vision, challenges and imperitives

1:30pm –  Year 3 class teacher (ADE) sharing his experiences blending, flipping and helping to drive STEM initiatives

1:50 –  Librarian – eBooks, QR Codes and Aurasma 

2:00 – Year 4 Maths in action creating interactive games using Futaba

2:10 – Year 3 Maths in action, differentiated leaning in a blended classroom using Stile

2:20 –  Music Year 5, GarageBand in action – creating music inspired by Star Wars

2:30 – Year 1 HSIE, Wet and Dry Environments using Pic Collage

Year 1 HSIE, Wet and Dry Environments using Popplet

2:40 – Year 4 Student Share Time – looking at student work samples and teacher experience – including CBL and 3D Printing

2:55 – Year 5 Student Share Time – looking at student work samples and teacher experience – including Book Creator Science Journals, Stop Motion, Keynote, iMovie, Minecraft

  

Bringing Computational Thinking Into Classrooms

  
One of the challenges for us has been how we can make what we are doing with technology and innovation a simple and natural part of what occurs in classrooms. We have certainly achieved this, in some considerable measure, via our 1:1 iPad program. In our learning environment iPads are, for the most part, a bit like a pencil case. They travel everywhere with students and they are pulled out for purposeful use as required.

Like many schools we have tended to hang things like robotics, coding, Minecraft, 3D printing on as side bits – extracurricular or co curricular. What we are really striving to see is classrooms filled with options naturally incorporating coding, robotics, Minecraft, 3D printing, circuits, recyclables, crafts etc – maker spaces which entice, inspire and enable.

So how do we hope to achieve our vision?

Firstly the vision is dependent on developing pedagogy to enable the learning environment. We are committing ourselves to fairly major shifts in thinking as we recognise that we need to be providing more authentic challenges, cross curricular project based learning, physical environments which change learning dynamics, making thinking visible and gaining insight through effective formative assessment, along with differentiation and more personalising learning opportunities. This is not to say that these are not in play already because they are occurring in varying degrees across our classrooms. The shift just needs to more universally enabled and embedded. The circumstances are right for us to pursue further change and our more innovative teachers are seeking opportunities to enhance their classroom and challenge their students. 

The plan below is dependent on two funding streams. The first allocation is towards professional development and the provision of release time so that teachers can explore and learn. The second funding stream is directed towards hardware and software acquisition.

The program would aim to:

  • Map learning activities associated with coding / robotics to Curriculum Outcomes
  • Provide students authentic learning opportunities using code / robotics 
  • Identify first order barriers to implementation in the classroom
  • Identify effective enablers for teachers and students
  • Consider ways to differentiate and personalise learning for students
  • Provide a roadmap for future development and improvement 
  • Engage and excite the school community about a STEM infused learning environment.
  • Measure the learning outcomes and engagement of students through empirical and anecdotal measures

Phase 1: Acquisition

Aim: To provide a broad understanding and provide teachers time to focus on an area of particular interest based on potential integration into learning programs.

A pilot group of teachers is identified (4 teachers – one teacher per year group). Provision of training and development e.g. Scratch, Tickle, Orbotix, Sphero, Lego Robotics, Xcode etc (we are actively exploring options).

Pilot/lead teacher(s) will be released to examine makers kits and rate them for suitability for different age groups – vendors to demonstrate their products. Teachers will choose from amongst the coding/robotics options the applications that they believe will have most application with the Stage 2 and Stage 3 class groups. 

We recognise that teachers may have a stronger connection or see greater potential with certain applications and this can be accommodated providing the teachers have a broad functional understanding of others. We are keen to see provision of diverse options for students in the longer term. It is expected that the pilot teachers would consider ways in which coding / robotics might be incorporated within existing learning programs.

Provision of 2 full days release per teacher.Provision of professional development resource personnel as required – providing specific training re coding and robotics. 

Phase 2: Implementation

Aim: To provide project based activities to engage and facilitate learning in a “Code Camp” – for students and teachers.

Pilot teachers develop a “Code Camp” series of lessons which target basic code and robotics skills and knowledge based on their experience in Phase 1. These will provide immersion opportunities for students and other teachers. Code Camp sessions would aim to provide for differentiated learning and would be run by the pilot group collaboratively with different class groups during our alternative activities week, which runs each year at the end of Term 4. Activities e.g. creation of a robotic dance, developing a solution to an authentic problem, or a solution to an authentic challenge. 
Provision of 4 days (one day per teacher) release time for pilot teachers to enable development of Code Camp activities etc. 

Evaluation of Code Camp Series. This will provide guidance to teachers for the development of programs that will leverage code / robotics in Term 1, 2016.

Phase 3: Application

Aim: To integrate Code / Robotics into learning programs and activities.

Participation of our students and teachers in external events / maker spaces e.g. Future Schools. Partnering with other schools etc.

Teachers work to integrate coding / robotics into one or more of their learning programs during the next three school terms. This may apply to Science and Maths specifically or may be a part of integrated Project Based Learning e.g. Challenge Based Learning, Problem Based Learning, Inquiry Based Learning etc. 

Enter groups in ICT Young Explorers 2016 and other learning challenges (Measure of success – if coding / robotics feature strongly as part of student work).

  

Update progress  to date: Stepping Out With Robotics and Coding | Learning Journey

Making It Easy Isn’t Easy

  

  
Walking into classrooms and seeing learning in action is always a great pleasure. I am seeing a range of activity which I wouldn’t have imagined could become a reality just three short years ago. It is amazing how far we have progressed in our journey towards making technology a truly integrated part of our learning environment. Even our perception of what integration looks like has changed and that in itself is exciting.

  • Students regularly recording their learning using a variety of media
  • Teachers delivering differentiated and personalised content directly to students via their devices
  • Student workflows leveraging multiple applications
  • Regular, integrated use of open ended applications
  • Teachers actively recording learning for formative assessment
  • Teachers providing timely, poignant feedback 
  • Students working, regularly in productive collaboration
  • Student and teacher intuitive engagement with technology
  • Curriculum being manipulated to leverage technology meaningfully 
  • Direct and necessary communication between students and teachers
  • Students and teachers happy to explore, try new things and take risks 
  • Students extending their own learning
  • Technology tools regularly employed to extend and support students 
  • Confident technology users
  • Changing classroom dynamic – use of space, the way teachers and students work together
  • Easy exchange of information between teachers and students
  • A shift in the relationship between the student and the teacher
  • Greater ownership of learning by the students
  • Open ended learning – PBL, CBL
  • Proliferation of authentic learning opportunities 

What I like best is that it all feels effortless. This isn’t to devalue the work of our wonderful teachers in any way because I know that in the background there is a great deal of effort being employed to enable the learning programs, but when I see it it feels completely natural. There isn’t a feeling of bells and whistles. The technology is seamlessly woven into the fabric of purposeful activity. And I know that this is how it is meant to be. 

Making it easy isn’t easy. So what have been the crucial elements which have enabled our progress to this point?

Firstly the technology itself needs to be right. This is a major component. The technology needs to work reliably, day after day. Crucially for us running with a 1:1 iPad Program Internet and Wireless infrastructure are vital enablers. We opted for a corporate level CISCO wireless network. These devices have worked perfectly and have coped well with the high demands of multi user traffic. Our Internet has been continuously improved as demand has grown (40 up / 40 Down). Providing redundancy in case of failure of this primary link is also essential. If our Internet fails then our classrooms stall too. We have a 10 up / 10 down fibre redundancy. 

iPads are our 1:1 device of choice and they have been brilliant. They have challenged us too, but once we understood the device and its Cloud based DNA we were able to leverage its versatility, portability and power. IPads for us have been a game changer. They have great battery life and they have proven to be extraordinarily robust and reliable. We turn over our iPads on a biannual basis. This maintains the quality of our iPad fleet. We do as little as possible regarding apps. Early on we realised that the best apps are the open ended ones and we only add odd apps here and there as required. In most instances the central core of apps are all that we require. Compnow have helped us with device deployment.

In our own experience Professional Development has been crucial to the success of our program. 

Before embarking on our 1:1 commitment we needed to invest in preparing our teachers. Initially we supplied all of our teachers with iPads. We conducted workshops and provided hands on support via a full time support teacher to help our teachers with the technical side of using devices and to support pedagogical change. 

We teamed with Datacom (originally Xcitelogic), a provider, who had a strong educational support team. We were able to leverage their experience, gained in early adopter iPad schools in Victoria, Western Australia, to inform our own experience. Datacom educators facilitated traditional workshops for our teachers and parents, but crucially they offered a mentoring program for our teachers. This mentoring enabled a personalised approach to support, grow and develop our teachers. Catering to the different needs of our teachers was essential and as a result we were able to bring all of our teachers along on a journey no matter what their starting point (this program is an ongoing part of our PD program). Teamed with this is a natural organic internal mentoring where our teachers work together to support each other.

Datacom educators have helped to push our boundaries and opened us to new possibilities.

We have also formed a close relationship with Apple Education and this relationship has provided ongoing vision around pedagogy and considerable inspiration and sense of purpose. We are supporting our teachers to participate in the Apple Distinguished Educator Program

We are actively, now, involving partners like Datacom, Apple, Stile, Clickview, CISCO and Furnware in the process of helping to develop our teachers. We have found great advantage in developing and leveraging external connections. 

Professional development has helped change us from being inward looking to becoming outward looking. Where we can we involve teachers in conferences and external workshops such as Edutech, Future Schools, AIS, Apple, VIVID, Datacom, Furnware, Stile etc. 

Our professional learning journey has delved widely into Curriculum, thinking processes, pedagogical theory along with the integration of technology. Our teachers are becoming leaders of change, they are open to new ideas and our students are the clear beneficiaries.

  

The third game changer for us has been the integration of Stile into our classrooms. This has been a relatively new component in our program. The to and fro of information between the teachers and students has been one of the greatest challenges presented by our brilliant iPad tool. While we could create amazing work on our iPads being able to easily view and share was difficult. Initially we were using a range of tools e.g. Dropbox, email, Evernote, Showbie, Edmodo and iTunes U (iTunesU has rich content which is valuable. With a recent update  (3.0) iTunesU now has capacity to interact in the to and fro of information more fully). All of these required accounts and offered different capacities. Stile has to a large extent allowed us to consolidate all of this via one application. Stile has “unlimited” capacity and is able to transfer all sorts of work. Stile has also enabled work anywhere, anytime capability because it is accessible via any browser as well as an app. Here I should mention that we don’t send iPads home (this has helped with maintenance and reliability) and Stile has meant that we have easily been able to blur the lines between home and school. Flipping becomes an easy, realistic option. 

The last element I will discuss is planning and leadership. In our circumstance having leadership and commitment from across the School has enabled our vision to become a reality. In my role as a dedicated resource (supporting, managing and dreaming) I have needed the commitment of many participants. Bringing all together in a purposeful way is key. Often with all of this it has been about DREAMING BIG. While I can certainly dream big sometimes there are those who can dream even bigger. Being open to the dreams and visions of others is most crucial. Our School Board is a good example of dreaming big. We have recently perceived a need to evolve our learning spaces. We were starting to consider how we might reinvent our existing classrooms with furniture and some minor renovation. Our amazingly progressive Board wanted to dream much bigger. A whole architectural program has resulted, which will substantially reinvent our school. Sometimes the dreams can become enormous challenges. Here I must emphasise that the vision is what makes the dream sustainable. Certainly this has been true of our recent evolution and our integration of iPads in our learning environment. Leadership and Big Dreams have punctuated this. Dreams of teachers, of parents, of students and of administrators have sparked and evolved the vision. The tricky bit is interpreting, articulating, realising and building these into the structure. Some of the dreams of course don’t become reality immediately timing is also crucial. Knowing what will fly and when is also important. I have a strong belief that simplicity is vital. Educators don’t need or want complexity as it gets in the way of the teaching and learning. Students also need things to work easily. So sometimes dreams have to wait for technologies to mature enough to be viable. I note here that in some school environments there is abundant technical support and often these schools are able to be early adopters. In our circumstance we can observe and learn from these early adopters. There is much to be gained from learning from the experience of others.

We are seeing a revolution occurring and being a part of the conversation is crucial. For my own part social networking is vital – conferences, workshops and Twitter have been major enablers. I read a huge amount and it helps that I am really obsessive about enabling our learning environments. Seeing it all working simply and seamlessly in a wholistic educational context is the really exciting part. 

  

Stile: A Few Impressions

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Early in Term 3 we commenced a trial of an application called Stile. You can read in more detail on a previous post https://rhp123.wordpress.com/2014/07/23/a-stile-ish-journey/
Since my first introduction to Stile, over a year ago, I have toyed with doing a trial. I think, now that we are concluding our trial, that Stile might be the truly robust teaching / learning solution that we have been seeking to team with our iPad Program. I must stress here that nothing is ever perfect. I still like Edmodo, Dropbox and iTunes U etc. I also keep stumbling on great new options like the new Glogster app. Possibilities are growing and the ground is constantly changing. One of the things that appeals about Stile is that it can easily fit into an eclectic environment like ours. When choosing something new, to use across K to 6, we need to take a firm step particularly as this application (Stile) will cost the school money.

When we came to undertake our trial, during Term 3, we needed a reasonable amount of time to really get the trial up and running across the K to 6 classes. This was provided. We also needed to run our trial across all of our classrooms. We wanted to know whether Stile would be suitable and be adopted by all age groups and potentially by all teachers. We wanted to know if Stile would make a significant difference wherever it was employed. I must say that the Stile team have been very helpful and supportive throughout and their willingness to accommodate our needs has helped to make our trial a meaningful one.

As our trial has drawn to a close we have sought teacher impressions. These are provided below via an exit survey which we posted in Google Forms. We sought responses from teachers who had really engaged in using Stile as part of their regular classroom activity during the trial period.

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Two Days in Brisbane – Edutech 2014

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I attended the 2014 Edutech Conference in Brisbane again this year.

In the past I have really enjoyed this conference. The calibre of the speakers is always excellent. This year was no exception. The lineup included Sir Ken Robinson, Sugata Mitra, Ewan McIntosh, Ian Jukes and many others.

The overarching message was about enabling learners.
#The constant theme, which was continuously articulated by the various keynote speakers, centred around the idea that education needs to change from the old industrial model, with a focus on content, to a model which develops creative thinkers.
#That individual’s needs need to be accommodated more actively in the learning process.
#That the teacher needs to get out of the way and facilitate and enable rather than hinder the learner with old instruction models. Ideas like Flipped Learning, Project Based Learning, Design Thinking, SAMR are potential enablers.
#With the advent of achievable 1:1 implementations schools need to be harnessing the opportunities which the technology brings.

Sugata Mitra’s insights into learning and how digital capacity can enable learning even in remote, backward regions of India was compelling. He stated that research has proven that threat is an impediment to learning and that testing can be threatening. Instead he argued for a Curriculum of questions, peer assessment and certification without examination. He spoke about creating Self organised learning environments (SOLE) arguing that the idea of regimented learning wasn’t the goal, but that collaboration, engagement and admiration were key.

I am always impressed with the ideas presented by Ewan McIntosh. He spoke about agile leadership and the need for schools to be responsive to change. He argued that it is OK to fail. He described FAIL as First Attempt In Learning. He talked about contradictions, tensions and surprises and that agile leadership is about taking these and using them.

Ian Dukes spoke about education in the age of disruptive innovation. He presented a passionate case which focused on the changing nature of the world and the need for schools and education systems to change. He argued that students of today need to be prepared for a very different tomorrow. Jobs will be increasingly global and will be much more about thinking and creativity. He cited the decline in industrial and service jobs and the growth of jobs such as app creation, jobs which will require collaboration and creative thought.

Sir Ken Robinson was very engaging in person. He is a compelling speaker any time and it was great to hear him speak twice during the conference. He argued that just as farming is moving to organic so too should education. He recognised the challenges that schools face from politicians, but was adamant that politicians are just passing through and that the responsibility for change lay with the educators. He told one of his great stories about the farming family who after generations of eking out a poor living on a farm learn that great wealth, in the form of nickel, lay just below the surface. Obviously the intent here is to point out that often schools fail to realise the full potential of their students.

I enjoyed the various presentations that I attended. A couple of the leadership team from Margaret River Primary School told a compelling story. Their presentation started with a parody which set the mood for their entertaining presentation. The learning environment that they have created, at Margaret River, was really engaging and exciting. Their simple incorporation of Caves, Waterholes, Campfires and Mountain Tops as a natural part of the learning environment was impressive. Some great ideas from these inspired educators.

Another speaker Greg Whitby, Executive Director of Schools, Catholic Education Diocese of Parramatta also had some great messages. He insisted that schools must innovate to improve outcomes for the individual learner and that we need Curriculum for the individual. It shouldn’t be one size fits all. He argued that Innovation is not experimentation and that we must base decisions on the best we know. He argued that schools should aim to create a positive environment for teachers and build teacher capacity. He sees teachers as entrepreneurs and the drivers of innovation. Learning spaces need to be collaborative, agile, personalised and have ubiquitous access to technology.

It was interesting to see where other schools are in their respective journeys and my impression was that most schools have either geared towards 1:1 or are moving in that direction. This being said a model which isn’t entirely 1:1 may be desirable as it enable greater collaboration (as Sugata Mitra’s work attests to).

It was I thought quite interesting to see where the clusters of interest were in the exhibition hall. I think that that gives some insight into where educators are and where they are headed. Certainly cloud based applications were extremely popular. Office 365, Google Apps, Stile, School Box and MyEd seemed to attract interest. This I think ties with our own needs. Being able to seamlessly move all sorts of data to and from various devices and platforms is a crucial enabler. My school will trial Stile (an Australian cloud solution) next term.
There was interest in innovations such as 3D printing, robotics and alternative furniture and in generalists such as Datacom (Here, I must say, it was refreshing to attend the Datacom Workshop because the presenter was talking insightfully about educational solutions rather than product).
It was interesting that this year wireless solutions, which were popular in previous years, were less of a focus this year. Perhaps many schools have invested in wireless upgrades already.

It was also great to see TeachMeets taking place in the exhibition area at the conference. The TeachMeets certainly added to the atmosphere and added great value to the event.

On a light note, I was catching a Taxi to the airport after the conference and I offered to share my taxi with a fellow traveller. It turned out that she was a delegate at the conference and that she had won the “Grand Prize” – which was a car. Hoping a little of that luck rubs off.

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Journeying with Abdul Chohan

Recently I had the pleasure of attending a seminar where I listened to (and engaged with) Abdul Chohan speaking about his school in England, Essa Academy http://www.essaacademy.org/vision-and-ethos.html. This is the second time that I had had a chance to be inspired by his story.
A metamorphosis occurred which saw the school achieve substantial (meteoric) improvement in academic outcomes for its students.
There were clearly a number of contributing factors which enabled this transformation. The solution which transformed Abdul’s school was unique and needed to be unique. There was, however, a central theme. Key to the school’s journey was the need to change belief. Abdul asserted that
“One person with belief is better than 99 with interest.”
All participants and stakeholders needed to be a infused with belief. Central to this was the belief that

“ALL will succeed.” And “Cognition is not fixed.”

In their model technology was a key platform for exchange of information etc between students and teachers. Teachers and students needed to believe that this technology was simple and reliable for adoption to occur.
Their initial implementation (2008) involved supplying iPods to all students. It involved providing a robust internet and wireless capability. Their internet was enabled through a fibre connection offering 100 Mbps up and 100 Mbps down and the wireless a state of the art Meru network http://www.merunetworks.com. The iPods offered both simplicity and reliability and the apps, many of which were free, empowered the students and teachers. Two mandatory applications were used for delivery and for response. iTunes U was required to be used by all teachers to deliver content and (the paid version of) Showbie was used as a key response platform by both students and teachers. These worked well together and provided a simple, reliable exchange between teacher and student. One of the immediate by-products of the adoption of this communication loop was a huge reduction in paper costs.

Teachers were also supported with professional development. The school innovated their approach by removing “pupil free days” and then incorporating these hours into regular PD sessions for all teachers during the normal school week. This meant that teachers’ out of hours time wasn’t impacted and that they could meet on a weekly basis to collaborate, share and learn. Once again this supported the teachers belief in their capacity and capability to improve student outcomes and engage with technology tools.

What Abdul was keen to stress was that their journey was about the pedagogy. There plan wasn’t about technology or about changing spaces. Their plan was about the pedagogy and about improving outcomes for ALL the students, about personalising the learning to suit student needs. It was about creating rich learning opportunities which aimed to leverage the SAMR Model http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/to transform. The leadership would formulate strategy and then enlist the support of players to make it happen. In the case of iTunes U, by example, a group of teachers and leaders across the school were recruited to develop programs, become expert, become advocates and infuse across the school. The technology was just the vehicle which was, at the bare bones, simple and reliable making adoption easy.

The parents and the community in general were an important part of the journey. The school worked hard to form relationships with the parents and community. They used food, which is often so culturally important, to bring their community together so that they could deliver messages, educate, inform. Parents too needed to believe and be invested in the vision.

Reflecting On The Journey

Our school is a Primary school (K – 6). We embraced a 1:1 iPad roll out in 2013.

Powerful Transformative Learning: Ideas around Workflow, SAMR (http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/) and TPCK (http://www.tpack.org) can become a reality in a 1:1 iPad program.

A host of different applications are in play across classrooms. Our school hasn’t attempted to be prescriptive. Allowing a degree of freedom amongst teachers has opened possibilities and teachers are also offering students options which expand the learning opportunities to individualize and to differentiate. We have tried to tailor applications to class needs, however certain apps are staple across most grades including all the Apple Applications iMovie, Pages, Keynote, Numbers, GarageBand, also Book Creator, Creative Book Builder, Edmodo, Explain Everything, Puppet Pals and Visualize. The more “open ended” applications are the most useful providing greater scope to both teachers and students. Student-centred, authentic, project-based learning experiences are being enhanced and inspired by the application of iPads.​

The capability of delivering content quickly through iTunes U, Edmodo, Showbie and Evernote has made opportunities for blended learning and of flipping Classrooms a reality. Teachers are developing class blogs or arranging Skype links with classes in other countries and bringing experts virtually into the classrooms and into children’s homes to support learning

Teachers are also actively using iPads to augment their assessment of student progress. The capability of the iPad to record learning moments, collect, collate and report is impressive.​
Our library has developed an eBook collection and borrowing system which means that students can access digital books virtually on a range of devices. This has opened access for students and learning opportunities in our classrooms.

Curriculum
In Australia there has been substantial change with regard to the Curriculum. The new Australian National Curriculum is seeking to integrate technology across all strands of the Curriculum. Our provision of iPads to all students in years K to 6 has provided the capability to achieve this. Teachers are redesigning their teaching programs to reflect the integration of technology, and in particular the integration of iPads, as the New Curriculum is released. Our school has a Curriculum Coordinator helping to coordinate change. The process is very much a collaborative team effort.
The Australian Curriculum includes seven General Capabilities as can be seen in the diagram below ICT Capability is identified as one of the seven General Capabilities to be addressed across the Curriculum.

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© Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority

Teacher Development
Our mission as educators, at our school, is to transform the potential technology offers to improve teaching and learning practices and ultimately, student outcomes.
The school has committed to developing a strong culture of learning aimed at developing learners for the 21st Century.
Our teachers have been actively involved in a comprehensive learning program. A Whole School approach was undertaken which targeted several key areas.
Differentiate teaching to meet specific needs of students across the full range of abilities.
Teachers undertook to complete a number of learning opportunities presented in an iTunes U Course and demonstrate differentiated strategies in programming of Curriculum including the use of technology to individualize and differentiate
Technology – Effective integration of iPads and other technology resources within the Curriculum.
Provision of an Apple Certified Educators (via external providers) to provide a structured mentoring program and workshops.
Crucially the school has continued to develop a Culture of Thinking (both amongst teachers and the students) where learning is more purposeful, deeper and more meaningful to students. ‘Thinking’ is an integral part of the learning process. Visible Thinking is tied strongly to our use of technology, Project Based Learning and broader Curriculum Outcomes. http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org
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Changing Spaces
The arrival of real mobile technology via the iPad has opened possibilities to change pedagogical practices. The way that classrooms are working is changing too. Escaping from traditional classrooms to more versatile spaces is another great by product of the iPad Program. Entering classrooms it is common to see children on floors, sitting in pairs, in clusters or just moving and doing, as well as working in traditional formations. What is clear is that spaces need to be able to accommodate many ways of learning and collaborating.
We are starting to think about how we can achieve this using existing structures, by adapting furniture, creating movable walls, using glass to open the environment, as well as reviewing timetables and student groupings. The school is engaging in a process to identify and plan, so that our existing and future buildings and spaces can be designed to accommodate for the changing needs of students, teachers, curriculum and the community.

iPad Impressions

Students started using iPads, as an integral part of their learning, in 2011. Teachers, students and parents embraced these simple, powerful devices. iPads have opened possibilities to really expand the learning opportunities of the students, particularly when teamed with excellent pedagogy.
In 2013 the School committed to providing iPads to all students from Year K to Year 6.

A number of surveys were conducted (late 2013) to gauge the attitudes of our school community to the program. This data provides important feedback about the iPad program and will be helpful in informing our approach in 2014.
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Survey of Parents

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Survey of Students
4 = Strongly Agree

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Survey of Teachers
4 = Strongly Agree

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A Wordle reflecting teacher impressions

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Sharing the Journey – a Japanese visit

We recently hosted a visit, of several educators, from Japan. The Japanese visitors were visiting a number of schools across Australia to see technology implementation in education. This was a great opportunity for our teachers and students to showcase some of the excellent work that is occurring across the school. The visitors were particularly interested to learn about our K to Year 6 iPad Program.

The schedule below provides a snapshot of the experience provided to the visitors.
*10:00 – 10:30 Meeting with the Principal and Technology Coordinator – Regarding our iPad Journey
Meet the teachers – show and tell with Classroom Teachers
*10:30 Curriculum Coordinator – using Itunes U for Professional Development and to deliver content to students in classrooms
*10:35 Year 3 classroom teachers using Edmodo to connect home and school
*10: 40 Year 4 classroom teachers – hands on using Nearpod to structure a lesson
*10:50 Year 6 classroom teachers – Creating a project on Notable Australians using Creative Book Builder, using Explain Everything to provide feedback
Classroom walk around
*11:00 Year 3 – Presenting a Mathematics project using Book Creator
*11:15 Year 5 – using Creative Book Builder to record observations in Science (Micro Organisms)
*11:30 Year 1 and 2 – Popplet (on living things), Explain Everything (to record an explanation), Comic Book (using punctuation)
*11:50 Library – how eBooks are managed and delivered to students, using QR Codes as a library tool
*12:00 Concluding

The visit really provided an opportunity for teachers and students to demonstrate the great success of the 1:1 iPad program. It also reflected how much we have grown the learning and teaching model, regarding the integration of technology, since the implementation of our iPad program.

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